Solicitors from heaven or hell?

Is this the right way to deal with complaints against solictors or just a case of solicitors from hell (unless they pay my fee!)

Rick Kordowski, who set up his website solicitorsfromhell.com, five years ago, did so after claiming to have lost £750,000 after being negligently advised on a planning dispute. He claims to have received £500 compensation, despite, in his words losing "......... everything … house, job, money, the whole shooting match." through the Law Society's complaints handling process as a result of professional negligence.

He does not vet the claims that appear on his site saying that he did try checking once but "Everyone denied the allegations and so I don't do it any more."

As well as solicitorsfromhell.com there is also a solicitorsfromheaven area on his site and the firms listed here are allegedly "good, decent, fighting, professional, passionate lawyers".  According to Kordowski ten of these firms have paid £299 for a lifetime listing which apparently includes a ban from being listed on the solicitorsfromhell site.

It does appear that firms can have their names removed from the solicitorsfromhell site, if they pay £299! Surely this defeats the whole object of having a web site which is meant to name and shame, if you can pay to have your name removed? By paying this fee do you suddenly become a "good, decent, fighting, professional, passionate lawyers". Although, to be fair, you would probably have to pay two fees to be able to claim that!

One defamation lawyer was listed on solicitorsfromhell, not by his own client but by the other side's.  Most people would consider this to be a recommendation and you would certainly not expect the opposition to be saying what a decent chap your solictor was!

There are procedures to follow if you have got a complaint regarding a solicitor and until sites such as this seem to be more credible perhaps we should stick with the traditional process.

There are changes ahead and the 6 October 2011 will see more competition under the LSA by allowing non-law businesses  to move further into legal services. So with more competition will we be able to make a more informed choice or will we still hope for the best and believe that because we are dealing with professional people they will have all the right answers.

Will we have compare the solicitor.com or yet more solictors from hell sites?

 

 

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