Chain of causation

Sometimes referred to when the defendant triggers a series of events involving others who contribute to the harm or injury of the victim.

A chain of causation is sometimes referred to when the defendant triggers a series of events involving others who may also contribute to the harm or injury of the victim.  The question then arises whether the original perpetrator should be responsible for the eventual outcome or another person in the chain?

A break in the chain of causation means that when this occurs the courts interpret this to mean that the accused’s conduct was not the cause of the harm or injury.  This is unusual but when it does occur it will result in the accused being acquitted.

A break in the chain of causation arises where there is a new intervening act or 'novus actus interveniens'.  In these circumstances it may not be appropriate to find the defendant responsible for the eventual outcome as others have played an important part in bringing this about.  The law may still want to blame the accused for the way in which he or she did act, but the law will also want to hold responsible the others for the part which they played if they were the main contributor to the outcome.

Causation # 1 - 'But For' by The Law Bank Youtube

Causation # 2 - Legal Causation by The Law Bank Youtube

Causation # 3 - Intervening Acts by The Law Bank  Youtube

causation in law :: www.forensicmed.co.uk

 

 

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