Written warning

Written warnings are usually reserved for more serious misconduct or repeated misconduct.

Disciplinary warnings are a common element of disciplinary procedures.

 

The principle of disciplinary warnings recognises that there may be some occasions when verbal warnings may need to be given for minor misconduct and that written warnings may need to be given for more serious matters. Disciplinary warnings have their origins in the ACAS Codes of Practice on Disciplinary and Grievance Procedures.

 

A verbal warning is considered to be disciplinary action which falls short of written warnings. Verbal warnings are appropriate for minor misconduct. A written record of the warning would be kept on the employees' personnel file for a specified period. The employee would be informed of the reason for the warning and provided with an opportunity of being heard.

 

A written warning should also be considered in the context of a disciplinary procedure and is normally appropriate where disciplinary action is required which falls short of summary dismissal. Written warnings are usually reserved for more serious misconduct or repeated misconduct.

 

A final written warning should also be considered to be disciplinary action which falls short of summary dismissal. Final written warnings are appropriate for serious misconduct or failure to respond to earlier warnings. This stage of the disciplinary action should state the possibility of suspension or dismissal.

 

The power to issue warnings are considered to be contractual in nature so it is important that such procedures are stated in any 'employee handbook' or 'rulebook'.

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